…And They’re Off…

As you may have read in my previous blog post, there has been some good news – the Leicester juvenile peregrines have both successfully left the nest.  The female left first on the 15th June at 17:43 and landed safely after a quick jump, flapping and tumble (I love how her sibling runs into shot after the fall)!  The male then had a nice elegant take-off on the 16th June at 05:18.  They have since both been spotted around the cathedral and on nearby roofs, often still sitting together.  I went into town on the 20th and could see a peregrine falcon near the top of the cathedral spire.  It did look smaller than when I have viewed the adults before, and also from what I could see looked slightly darker on the chest – so I would like to think it was one of the youngsters, but I didn’t have my binoculars with me so could not be sure… it may well have been the adult male.

Throughout June, I continued to watch them grow on the live cameras and as expected in my last post about them, the final stage of development was very quick indeed.  Their body feathers replaced their white ‘fluff’ within days, they were frequently exploring, sitting on the ledge, flapping their wings and running around the nest box – even taking prey items and feeding themselves!  At some point during the month, I thought one of them had left the nest as every time I checked, I could only see one.  Upon close examination, I eventually saw the edge of some feathers near the bottom of the screen and realised that they had found a hiding place out of shot, under the camera.  They also liked to sit in front of the pillar, but their shadows gave that hiding place away!

l24

I have really enjoyed watching the Leicester peregrines and sharing their journey with you, and thank Jim Graham for keeping the written commentary up to date on the official website!  Hopefully the juveniles will soon go their separate ways and have families of their own in the future, and as they have been ringed we may even find out what they get up to, or at least where they go.  The adults are likely to return to this nest next year, so fingers crossed for more successful breeding.

To end their story for this year, here’s a lovely image of the two juveniles together on the 14th June, the day before the first flight…

l25Stills taken from Leicester Peregrines live cameras (a collaboration between LROS and LCC).

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