…And They’re Off…

As you may have read in my previous blog post, there has been some good news – the Leicester juvenile peregrines have both successfully left the nest.  The female left first on the 15th June at 17:43 and landed safely after a quick jump, flapping and tumble (I love how her sibling runs into shot after the fall)!  The male then had a nice elegant take-off on the 16th June at 05:18.  They have since both been spotted around the cathedral and on nearby roofs, often still sitting together.  I went into town on the 20th and could see a peregrine falcon near the top of the cathedral spire.  It did look smaller than when I have viewed the adults before, and also from what I could see looked slightly darker on the chest – so I would like to think it was one of the youngsters, but I didn’t have my binoculars with me so could not be sure… it may well have been the adult male.

Throughout June, I continued to watch them grow on the live cameras and as expected in my last post about them, the final stage of development was very quick indeed.  Their body feathers replaced their white ‘fluff’ within days, they were frequently exploring, sitting on the ledge, flapping their wings and running around the nest box – even taking prey items and feeding themselves!  At some point during the month, I thought one of them had left the nest as every time I checked, I could only see one.  Upon close examination, I eventually saw the edge of some feathers near the bottom of the screen and realised that they had found a hiding place out of shot, under the camera.  They also liked to sit in front of the pillar, but their shadows gave that hiding place away!

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I have really enjoyed watching the Leicester peregrines and sharing their journey with you, and thank Jim Graham for keeping the written commentary up to date on the official website!  Hopefully the juveniles will soon go their separate ways and have families of their own in the future, and as they have been ringed we may even find out what they get up to, or at least where they go.  The adults are likely to return to this nest next year, so fingers crossed for more successful breeding.

To end their story for this year, here’s a lovely image of the two juveniles together on the 14th June, the day before the first flight…

l25Stills taken from Leicester Peregrines live cameras (a collaboration between LROS and LCC).

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Drama On The Peregrine Ledge

It has been an action-packed few weeks for the NTU peregrine falcon chicks.  After spending a week in Dartmoor (me, not the chicks) with little internet access, I returned on May 26th to discover that all four were out of the nest and exploring the surrounding ledge.  Most of their down had been replaced by stunning feathers and they were looking truly beautiful and elegant.

They have since been feeding themselves, flapping their wings, spending more time on their own and out of sight of the cameras, but on June 1st camera one captured something extremely dramatic (and a little bit funny if you keep watching it) which you can view in slow motion here.

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As you can see, one of the chicks attempted to fly and ended up crashing into its mother causing them to tumble off the edge of the building!  Luckily both were fine and the chick landed on a lower ledge.  As the chick had not properly fledged and was unable to fly, it could not return to the nest, however it has been reported that the adults have continued to feed it!  Despite this, I (and I am sure many others) have been a little worried about the chick over the last few days in the rain and wind… and unfortunately I have some sad news.  After following the peregrine falcons throughout the whole nesting cycle, it breaks my heart to announce that earlier today the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust reported that one of the chicks (I am not entirely sure whether it was the one on the lower ledge) had “been killed yesterday on the road below the ledge”.  It is assumed that “it got blown off or lost control of a flight in the ferocious wind we have been experiencing”.  Obviously this is a terrible shame as the four chicks were each doing brilliantly, but it is important to know and remember that less than a third of peregrines actually reach breeding age, so the family have still done very well.  Those peregrines that do reach breeding age are expected to live for 6-13 years, but the oldest known peregrine was over 16 years old!  So let’s keep our fingers crossed for the remaining three!

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All stills taken from the NTU live stream.